From the oldest veteran to the youngest scout troop, flags are handed to Mesquite firefighters who properly disposed of them at a ceremony held at the Mesquite Veterans Center, Saturday, Nov. 19. Photo by Barbara Ellestad.

From the oldest veteran to the youngest scout troop, flags are handed to Mesquite firefighters who properly disposed of them at a ceremony held at the Mesquite Veterans Center, Saturday, Nov. 19. Photo by Barbara Ellestad.

As Chuck Caldwell, Commander, VFW Post 7385 read a history of the U.S. Flag, children from local Boy Scout and Girl Scout troops held the cloth of a flag that would be ceremonially disposed of by the Mesquite Fire Department. Parents and veterans gathered at the Mesquite Veterans Center on Saturday, Nov. 19 to watch the flag burning ceremony.

A pile of used and unserviceable U.S. flags lay ready for the fire during a ceremony led by Mesquite Fire Captain William Martinez. Photo by Barbara Ellestad.

A pile of used and unserviceable U.S. flags lay ready for the fire during a ceremony led by Mesquite Fire Captain William Martinez. Photo by Barbara Ellestad.

Dozens of used and unserviceable flags laid ready for the fire, the only proper way to lay them to rest.

Captain William Martinez, Mesquite Fire Department, first cut the blue field from the flag. Then, as the scouts continued to hold the remaining part, Martinez cut the red and white stripes off, one by one. Each remnant pile was burned separately as tradition dictates.

Mesquite Fire Captain William Martinez, left, ceremoniously cuts a U.S. Flag into pieces that will be burned as local Boy Scout and Girl Scout troops hold the remaining parts. Photo by Barbara Ellestad.

Mesquite Fire Captain William Martinez, left, ceremoniously cuts a U.S. Flag into pieces that will be burned as local Boy Scout and Girl Scout troops hold the remaining parts. Photo by Barbara Ellestad.

As the ceremony ended, the scouts and audience members pulled a flag from the pile and presented it to Mesquite firefighters to lay on the hot burning coals.

It was a fitting way for all ages to continue the respect and honor due the U.S. flag.