By Jenny Riddick and AlixSandra Parness

The Mesquite Fine Arts Center is proud to be hosting John Huerta, Jr.’s workshop, “Breaking Down the Complexities of Landscape Painting” on Octt.3, 4 and 5.

Born in Ogden, Utah, John Huerta, Jr. is a nationally recognized emerging artist (recently featured in Western Art Collector magazine, July 2019, and Southwest Art magazine, August 2019, and graphic designer (in addition to all his artistic works, John teaches graphic design at Ogden-Weber Technical College in Ogden).

He was introduced to drawing by his mother and was drawing at a very early age.  As a child, he loved to paint and draw wildlife.   John studied with several local artists and learned to work in pastels, watercolors and oils.  For the last several years he has been dedicated to working outdoors and has won several awards for his plein air work and participates in many plein air events throughout the year.

Students of John’s workshop will learn how to:

  • Create more consistently engaging paintings
  • Develop cohesive compositions by focusing on an interesting combination of shapes
  • Edit a scene to create the most interesting composition
  • Create a center of focus and a clear area of emphasis
  • Establish a color scheme
  • Produce more dynamic images by paying attention to space division• Establish a “key” for a painting

Additionally, although John will be working in oils & acrylics, students using any medium may attend and will benefit from this workshop.  The concepts taught in his workshop will give ALL students more confidence in their approach to a painting.

For detailed workshop synopsis and registration information, please visit The Mesquite Fine Arts Center website at www.mesquitefineartscenter.com, menu item “Upcoming Workshops” or Facebook at “Mesquite Fine Arts Center”.

Huerta said,  “Success for me is conveying a sense of time and place in my paintings. I’m inspired by color and contrast, attempting to organize the unlimited variation of nature into a personal statement. I try to leave enough unsaid so that the viewer can add their perception and understanding to the work. “