When it rains enough, passers-by can see these waterfalls from Old Highway 91 near Beaver Dam. Photo courtesy of Cheryl McGehee.

When it rains enough, passers-by can see these waterfalls from Old Highway 91 near Beaver Dam. Photo courtesy of Cheryl McGehee.

Water flowing off of the interstate was causing its own issues, as seen here from Old Highway 91 in Beaver Dam. The flood waters caused erosion to come off of the overpass and expose some support beams along with moving dirt onto the roadway. Photo courtesy of Sonny Graham.

Water flowing off of the interstate was causing its own issues, as seen here from Old Highway 91 in Beaver Dam. The flood waters caused erosion to come off of the overpass and expose some support beams along with moving dirt onto the roadway. Photo courtesy of Sonny Graham.

Flood advisories were put into effect last weekend for many parts of southern Nevada and northwest Arizona. While Mesquite may have missed out on any major impacts from the rains other than slightly flooded intersections, Overton and Beaver Dam residents saw some other views.

According to the National Weather Service in Las Vegas, Overton’s measurement of rain from Friday to Sunday was incomplete although nearby in Moapa and Glendale, there was just .70” recorded. Meanwhile, Beaver Dam recorded 1.95”, Littlefield with 1.89“ and Mesquite only recorded 1.41” of rain for the same time period.

Several residents in Beaver Dam submitted photos to the Mesquite Local News of the flooding on their streets and homes, although nothing was comparable to the recent 100 year floods the area endured in 2005 and 2010.

Other areas only suffered their normal problems. In Overton, SR 169, also known as Moapa Valley Boulevard, had its normal problems for those heading to the Lost City Museum. The road was constructed with a low dip and floods with mud and water nearly every time it rains.

Anyone who has traveled through Overton to go to the Lost City Museum knows of the spot that has a sign up year-round for flash floods. That area was, as usual, flooded and needed a front loader to move the mud out of the roadway. Photo courtesy of the Lost City Museum.

Anyone who has traveled through Overton to go to the Lost City Museum knows of the spot that has a sign up year-round for flash floods. That area was, as usual, flooded and needed a front loader to move the mud out of the roadway. Photo courtesy of the Lost City Museum.

The MLN contacted Nevada Department of Transportation Public Information Officer Tony Illia, asking why this area has not received some kind of relief since it is a constant issue during monsoon season and periods of heavy rains.

“The department of transportation – due to limited funding availability – must prioritize projects based upon safety needs, traffic volume, and freight movement. The 18.5-mile-long State Route 169 – connecting Logandale, Overton, and the Moapa Valley – is considered a scarcely traveled local route. And the department is responsible for the most effective use of tax dollars that impacts the greatest amount of people. State Route 169, consequently, doesn’t meet the criteria for new infrastructure investment when compared with the state’s more densely developed metropolitan regions,” he said.

According to Mesquite officials, there was little to no damage throughout the city that isn’t expected during a storm, limited to mostly mud and dirt washing into the roadways as well as intersections gathering higher levels of water.