WCFA Pets Needing People

WCFA’s featured pet is Cody.  Cody is a handsome, long haired cream colored kittenabout 5 ½ months old.  He is the last of a litter of six and has slowly come around to be more social.  Cody is mellow and enjoys just hanging out.  Cody is altered and current on vaccines. He enjoys lounging on a cat condo, looking out the window watching the world go by. Cody is shy and would do best with a family that has a lot of time to give him the attention he needs. 

If you are interested in any of our pets, please go to www.wecareforanimals.org  where you can see all of our adoptable pets and you can complete an adoption application. For more information call us at 702-346-3326 (voicemail), call Karen at 435-862-9574 or Linda at 702-376-1642. Next pet adoption is November 11,  9:30 am – 12:30 pm  (please note we have switched to fall/winter hours) at Suite 1, 150 N. Yucca. Questions? Email us at wcfanv@gmail.com.  Follow us on Facebook at facebook.com/wecareforanimalsmesquitenv.  Please call us to schedule a visit with our pets at a mutually convenient time.

Other Available Pets: 

CATS:

Kittens 

Marshmallow and Tundra:  These two beautiful white kittens are 9 weeks old.  As happens often with pure white kittens, they are deaf.  Marshmallow and Tundra have gorgeous gray eyes.  Both are sweet, well adjusted, kittens.  Marshmallow is the female of the group. We would like the kittens to go together and to a home with no small children.  If you are interested in one of these cuties, please complete our online application at www.wecareforanimals.org.  We can then start the process of pre-approval for adoption. Once the kittens are old enough to be altered, they will be ready for their new homes.

DOGS:                   

 We do not have any dogs at this time.  Please check with the animal shelter.

WCFA will be marching in the Veterans Day Parade on November 4th.  Please come and show your appreciation for our veterans.

WCFA offers a wonderful low-cost/free opportunity to spay/neuter your pets to prevent accidental litters and keep your pet happy and healthy. We will always alter feral cats to be released back in their environment.  Our target areas are Mesquite, Bunkerville and the Arizona Strip.  Spay/Neuter Assistance Applications are available at Mesquite Veterinary Clinic located at 371 Riverside Road and Virgin Valley Veterinary Hospital at 660 Hardy Way.  You may also call WCFA at 702-346-3326 to leave a message or visit wecareforanimals.org to contact us by email.  Half of all litters born in the U.S. are accidents that overburden shelters and rescues.

Military Dogs

Contemporary dogs in military roles are also often referred to as police dogs, or in the United States and United Kingdom as a Military Working Dog (MWD), or K-9. Their roles are nearly as varied as their ancient cousins, though they tend to be more rarely used in front-line formations. As of 2011, 600 U.S. Military dogs were actively participating in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Traditionally, the most common breed for these police-type operations has been the German Shepherd; in recent years there has been a shift to smaller dogs with keener senses of smell for detection work, and more resilient breeds such as the Belgian Malinois and Dutch Shepherd for patrolling and law enforcement. All MWDs in use today are paired with a single individual after their training. This person is called a handler. While a handler usually won’t stay with one dog for the length of either’s career, usually a handler will stay partnered with a dog for at least a year, and sometimes much longer.

The latest canine tactical vests are outfitted with cameras and durable microphones that allow dogs to relay audio and visual information to their handlers.

In the 1970s the US Air Force used over 1,600 dogs worldwide. Today, personnel cutbacks have reduced USAF dog teams to approximately 530, stationed throughout the world. Many dogs that operate in these roles are trained at Lackland Air Force Base, the only United States facility that currently trains dogs for military use.

Change has also come in legislation for the benefit of the canines. Prior to 2000, older war dogs were required to be euthanized. The new law permits adoption of retired military dogs.  One notable case of which was Lex, a working dog whose handler was killed in Iraq.

There are numerous memorials dedicated to war dogs, including March Field Air Museum in Riverside, California; the Infantry School at Fort Benning, Georgia; at the Naval Facility, Guam, with replicas at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine in Knoxville; the Alfred M. Gray Marine Corps Research Center in Quantico, Virginia; and the Alabama War Dogs Memorial at the USS Alabama Battleship Memorial Park in Mobile, Alabama. Wikipedia

Comments

  1. I would take that kitten and give him an awesome (pawsome) home for life if you charged a reasonable fee

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