Mesquite Animal Shelter Pet Listing September 29 2017

Hairballs in cats

What Causes a Hairball?

During a cat’s daily grooming regimen the cat unintentionally inadvertently swallow loose hair, which generally passes through the digestive system into the cat’s stool Some hair can remain, however, and collect in the stomach or small intestine, causing the cat to hack, gag or retch until he vomits the offending detritus. The hair that is vomited can appear matted or tubular in shape. Cats that have long hair, shed excessively or constantly groom themselves are prone to developing hairballs.

What Are the General Symptoms of Hairballs?

The primary symptoms of hairballs are periodic hacking, gagging and vomiting. Hairballs may also cause decreased appetite and constipation. You might see accumulated hair in the vomited material. However, sometimes a hairball can cause an upset stomach and the cat will bring up just food or mucus

Is It Harmful to My Cat’s Health?

Most hairballs are harmlessly coughed up by your cat and do not pose a threat to his or her health. Please contact your veterinarian for an examination if your cat:

  • Continues gagging for more than one day
  • Seems constipated
  • Suffers from chronic diarrhea

How Can I Prevent Hairballs?

If your veterinarian has determined that hairballs are causing your cat’s occasional vomiting, there are several ways to help decrease their formation:

Brush your cat to decrease the amount of hair that is ingested. If he has long hair, try to brush him daily. Afterwards, wipe your cat with a clean cloth to remove any loose hairs.

There are dietary options for your cat that may help decrease the risk of hairballs as well. Feed your pet commercial cat food specifically formulated to reduce hairballs. By improving skin and coat health, reducing shedding and increasing the amount of fiber in your cat’s diet, certain foods can decrease the formation of hairballs.

Give your cat a hairball remedy or lubricant, available at most pet supply stores, to help your cat pass hairballs through the digestive tract. Such products should be used as directed. Laxair contains a gentle effective lubricant to aid in the elimination of swallowed hair and preventions of hairballs. Most cats love the taste.

If your cat grooms himself excessively, give him a new toy or engage him in play to distract him from this activity. This will redirect your cat’s attention from grooming to playing with the new toy — and provide an opportunity to enjoy some quality time with your pet.

If your cat suffers from frequent hairballs, contact your veterinarian to discuss possible treatment options, including changing your cat’s diet.

Featured dog- At this time there are no dogs available for adoption

Featured Cat- Lara

Lara is a beautiful gray and white 2 year old kitty. She was brought to shelter by her owner with 2 other cats because of a move and not being able to take the animals  to new home. She is outgoing and will come when called. She is a calm cat and loves to be petted and brushed. Nice young cat.

Other available cats

Ginger is a senior lady who is declawed in front. She does not like other cats so would need to be only cat in home. she loves to be petted and brushed

Ashes is a large cat. She is very shy and will need a quiet home. she loves to be petted and brushed

Mioggie is a young kitty. Outgoing and loves people. Likes to play with toys

Winnie is a very calm quiet lady. she will keep you company and not demand much except some love and attention.

Twinkle loves everyone. She will come when called. Calm kitty. Loves pets, toys and brushing.

Misty loves to be brushed. she will rub the brush if you don’t have time to hold it. Best as only cat. Nice calm lady.

All animals will be spayed or neutered prior to leaving shelter and receive 1 year rabies vaccination and city license. Ages are approximate.

The City of Mesquite Animal Shelter located at 795 Hardy Way is open for adoptions from 11am until 1 pm, Monday through Saturday, Sunday 1pm -3pm. Please call 702-346-7415 during these hours to speak to the front desk. Animal Control may be reached by phone or voicemail at 702-346-5268 

The animals submitted to the media may have changed so please visit our Petfinder website for a current listing and more detailed information on the animals. www.mesquiteanimalshelter.petfinder.com

Please also check our Facebook pages for lost and found animals along with pet information. https://www.facebook.com/MesquiteNVAnimalControl  and https://www.facebook.com/FRIENDSOFMESQUITENVANIMALSHELTER

 

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