Letter to the editor-Harvilak, Clever credit card scam! This is a new one!

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This is very clever. I would probably fall for it if not warned. Give this wide distribution. This scam is actually very clever. Just when you thought you’d heard it all. Be very careful out there! Beware of people bearing gifts.

The following is a recounting of the incident from the victim:

“Wednesday a week ago, I had a phone call from someone saying that he was from some outfit called: “Express Couriers,” (The name could be any courier company). He asked if I was going to be home because there was a package for me that required a signature.

The caller said that the delivery would arrive at my home in roughly an hour. Sure enough, about an hour later, a uniformed delivery man turned up with a beautiful basket of flowers and a bottle of wine. I was very surprised since there was no special occasion or holiday, and I certainly didn’t expect anything like it. Intrigued, I inquired as to who the sender was.

The courier replied, “I don’t know, I’m only delivering the package.”

Apparently, a greeting card was being sent separately. (The card has never arrived!) There was also a consignment note with the gift.

He then went on to explain that because the gift contained alcohol, there was a $3.50 “delivery/ verification charge,” providing proof that he had actually delivered the package to an adult (of legal drinking age), and not just left it on the doorstep where it could be stolen or taken by anyone, especially a minor.

This sounded logical and I offered to pay him cash. He then said that the delivery company required payment to be by credit or debit card only, so that everything is properly accounted for, and this would help in keeping a legal record of the transaction.

He added, “Couriers don’t carry cash to avoid loss or likely targets for robbery.”

My husband, who by this time was standing beside me, pulled out his credit card, and ‘John,’ the “delivery man,” asked him to swipe the card on a small mobile card machine with a small screen and keypad.

Frank, my husband, was asked to enter his PIN number and a receipt was printed out. He was given a copy of the transaction. The guy said everything was in order, and wished us good day.

To our horrible surprise, between Thursday and the following Monday, $4,000 had been charged/withdrawn from our credit/debit account at various ATM machines.

Apparently the “mobile credit card machine,” which the deliveryman carried now had all the info necessary to create a “dummy” card with all our card details including the PIN number.

Upon finding out about the illegal transactions on our card, we immediately notified the bank which issued us a new card, and our credit/debit account was closed.

We also personally went to the Police, where it was confirmed that it is definitely a scam because several households had been similarly hit.

Above all, the only time you should give out any personal credit/debit card information is when you yourself initiated the purchase or transaction!

Dave Harvilak

Mesquite

 

Comments

  1. Steve Clutterham says:

    A strange man came to your door and you let him scan your credit card on a hand held card reader? Really? Here’s a big hint for you, NEVER pay for something on a hand held scanner. Only use your debit or credit in known, established businesses. And do NOT let someone walk away with your card to scan it outside of your sight, make them do it right in front of you. And NEVER give out your credit card info to anybody you don’t know and can not trace and verify their info. There is no such thing as free anything, including flowers and wine. Be very careful out there people.

  2. John Sadler says:

    Thanks, Dave. Scams are always about putting people on the spot to make a quick decision. Seniors are vulnerable to these because they grew up in a more trusting world. Thanks again, we will be passing this along.

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