Mesquite Night Out photos

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Multiple businesses, groups and political candidates took the opportunity to greet the community at the 2016 Mesquite Night Out on Sept. 21. Doris Baeza and Rob Fuller from Mesa View Regional Hospital were on hand to educate the community about what their hospital offers. Photo by Stephanie Clark.

Multiple businesses, groups and political candidates took the opportunity to greet the community at the 2016 Mesquite Night Out on Sept. 21. Doris Baeza and Rob Fuller from Mesa View Regional Hospital were on hand to educate the community about what their hospital offers. Photo by Stephanie Clark.

Firefighters AprilLee Lebaron, left, and Spencer Lewis, right, take some time in between skits to interact and talk with Mesquite’s youth at the 2016 Mesquite Night Out event on Sept. 21. Photo by Stephanie Clark.

Firefighters AprilLee Lebaron, left, and Spencer Lewis, right, take some time in between skits to interact and talk with Mesquite’s youth at the 2016 Mesquite Night Out event on Sept. 21. Photo by Stephanie Clark.

Virgin Valley High School Senior Reid Jensen volunteered to be tazed at this year’s Mesquite Night Out on Sept. 21. Jensen was talked into it by his brother-in-law Quinn Averett, who is currently the Public Information Officer with Mesquite Police Department. Jensen said he volunteered because “I thought it would be real cool to do it,” he said. “I couldn’t really move.” Thankfully, the effects of the paralyzing tazor wore off before his performance at the football game two days later where he plays as a tight end. After high school, Jensen will depart for a two-year mission. Averett told the MLN that the amount of power in this instance was about 10,000 watts. “The stun mimics the central nervous system, and while the person cannot move or talk, they can still think and breathe. We usually only have to use extreme force like this two to three times per year, which considering the amount of arrests and incidents, is very low.” Photo by Stephanie Clark.

Virgin Valley High School Senior Reid Jensen volunteered to be tazed at this year’s Mesquite Night Out on Sept. 21. Jensen was talked into it by his brother-in-law Quinn Averett, who is currently the Public Information Officer with Mesquite Police Department. Jensen said he volunteered because “I thought it would be real cool to do it,” he said. “I couldn’t really move.” Thankfully, the effects of the paralyzing tazor wore off before his performance at the football game two days later where he plays as a tight end. After high school, Jensen will depart for a two-year mission. Averett told the MLN that the amount of power in this instance was about 10,000 watts. “The stun mimics the central nervous system, and while the person cannot move or talk, they can still think and breathe. We usually only have to use extreme force like this two to three times per year, which considering the amount of arrests and incidents, is very low.” Photo by Stephanie Clark.

Virgin Valley High School Senior Reid Jensen volunteered to be tazed at this year’s Mesquite Night Out on Sept. 21. Jensen was talked into it by his brother-in-law Quinn Averett, who is currently the Public Information Officer with Mesquite Police Department. Jensen said he volunteered because “I thought it would be real cool to do it,” he said. “I couldn’t really move.” Thankfully, the effects of the paralyzing tazor wore off before his performance at the football game two days later where he plays as a tight end. After high school, Jensen will depart for a two-year mission. Averett told the MLN that the amount of power in this instance was about 10,000 watts. “The stun mimics the central nervous system, and while the person cannot move or talk, they can still think and breathe. We usually only have to use extreme force like this two to three times per year, which considering the amount of arrests and incidents, is very low.” Photo by Stephanie Clark.

Virgin Valley High School Senior Reid Jensen volunteered to be tazed at this year’s Mesquite Night Out on Sept. 21. Jensen was talked into it by his brother-in-law Quinn Averett, who is currently the Public Information Officer with Mesquite Police Department. Jensen said he volunteered because “I thought it would be real cool to do it,” he said. “I couldn’t really move.” Thankfully, the effects of the paralyzing tazor wore off before his performance at the football game two days later where he plays as a tight end. After high school, Jensen will depart for a two-year mission. Averett told the MLN that the amount of power in this instance was about 10,000 watts. “The stun mimics the central nervous system, and while the person cannot move or talk, they can still think and breathe. We usually only have to use extreme force like this two to three times per year, which considering the amount of arrests and incidents, is very low.” Photo by Stephanie Clark.

Mesquite Police Department’s K-9 Officer Noro demonstrated his abilities to sniff out drugs at the 2016 Mesquite Night Out on Sept. 21. Noro, who is now six years old, is motivated by a toy his handler, Jamie Stout, uses. When Noro sniffs out the drugs he will lay down and point with his nose to their location. Stout, who moved to Mesquite about a year ago from New Mexico, enjoys working with Noro. “He’s a really smart and talented dog,” he told the MLN. Photo by Stephanie Clark.

Mesquite Police Department’s K-9 Officer Noro demonstrated his abilities to sniff out drugs at the 2016 Mesquite Night Out on Sept. 21. Noro, who is now six years old, is motivated by a toy his handler, Jamie Stout, uses. When Noro sniffs out the drugs he will lay down and point with his nose to their location. Stout, who moved to Mesquite about a year ago from New Mexico, enjoys working with Noro. “He’s a really smart and talented dog,” he told the MLN. Photo by Stephanie Clark.

Mesquite Police Department’s K-9 Officer Noro demonstrated his abilities to sniff out drugs at the 2016 Mesquite Night Out on Sept. 21. Noro, who is now six years old, is motivated by a toy his handler, Jamie Stout, uses. When Noro sniffs out the drugs he will lay down and point with his nose to their location. Stout, who moved to Mesquite about a year ago from New Mexico, enjoys working with Noro. “He’s a really smart and talented dog,” he told the MLN. Photo by Stephanie Clark.

Mesquite Police Department’s K-9 Officer Noro demonstrated his abilities to sniff out drugs at the 2016 Mesquite Night Out on Sept. 21. Noro, who is now six years old, is motivated by a toy his handler, Jamie Stout, uses. When Noro sniffs out the drugs he will lay down and point with his nose to their location. Stout, who moved to Mesquite about a year ago from New Mexico, enjoys working with Noro. “He’s a really smart and talented dog,” he told the MLN. Photo by Stephanie Clark.

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