Red Rooster renovation restores valley landmark

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The giant rooster previously had white socks and tail. Photo courtesy of www.weirdnv.com

The giant rooster previously had white socks and tail. Photo courtesy of www.weirdnv.com

There are many places in the Virgin and Moapa Valleys that are still standing even after being built nearly 70 years ago. One of those places is the Red Rooster Bar in Overton, which is the oldest bar in the Moapa Valley, operating since the late 1930s. It was created for those who were working on the Hoover Dam.

What makes the establishment so noticeable, however, is the giant rooster that sits upon a perch on the corner of the building. It is speculated that the large bird was constructed by International Fiberglass sometime in the 1960s, when over 200 others were created and sold to hundreds of businesses in California.

Since its creation, there have been restorations, with the most recent being November 2015, when it was taken down. “It was in pretty bad shape, falling apart,” said owner Kent Slight, who purchased the business in April 2005. “It’s been shot at so many times and was so faded we finally had to do something about it.”

Eight months later on June 11, the rooster made its return to the bar it belongs to with a new pair of socks and some new color on its tail.

Joshua Slight demonstrates one of the many poses that used to be done when patrons of the Red Rooster would climb to the roof and then to the nearly 16 foot pole to sit atop Overton’s famous Red Rooster. Photo by Kent Slight.

Joshua Slight demonstrates one of the many poses that used to be done when patrons of the Red Rooster would climb to the roof and then to the nearly 16 foot pole to sit atop Overton’s famous Red Rooster. Photo by Kent Slight.

“The Rooster has a future,” said Joshua Slight, Kent’s son. “This is an icon of the valley and it’s nice to have it back and better than ever.” Josh also mentioned that he intends on taking over the operations of the Red Rooster Bar when his parents retire.

“The patrons used to get up there and ride on it, back when the police force was more relaxed,” said Josh. “It’s a bit dangerous to be up there. The pole used to be higher, from what I have been told. I wish it was twice as high so that people couldn’t get up there, but sign codes restrict the height. I am very excited, though, that it is back where it should be!”

The restoration cost several thousands of dollars in those eight months, but all repairs and materials were credited to Danny Maxwell who did the work in town. Kent hopes that the next renovation will be a couple of decades down the road, long after he has retired. In the meantime, there will be added security cameras around the property to help discourage vandals from stealing or destroying it.

 

 

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