Pumpkin Carving Activity Draws a Crowd

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Gooey, slimy, stringy gobs of pumpkin guts and colorful paints adorned the hands, and some mouths, of many Mesquite children on Saturday Oct. 17 when the Virgin Valley Heritage Museum opened up the yard for their pumpkin carving and painting event.

Asher, Hyrum and Ezra Baker scoop out the “awesome feeling” pumpkin seeds and mess so their mom can begin carving out the perfectly scary Jack-0-Lantern this family plans on showing off on their front porch.  The Bakers are just one of the many families who attended the Virgin Valley Heritage Museum’s free-to-the-public Pumpkin Carving and Painting event on Oct. 17.  Photo by Teri Nehrenz.

Asher, Hyrum and Ezra Baker scoop out the “awesome feeling” pumpkin seeds and mess so their mom can begin carving out the perfectly scary Jack-0-Lantern this family plans on showing off on their front porch. The Bakers are just one of the many families who attended the Virgin Valley Heritage Museum’s free-to-the-public Pumpkin Carving and Painting event on Oct. 17. Photo by Teri Nehrenz.

Elspeth Kuta, museum coordinator, was extremely pleased with the turnout of over 40 parents and children. She stayed very busy handing out 30 pumpkins, paints, tools and designs purchased by the museum for this free family event sponsored by the City of Mesquite.

Ezra Baker said that pulling out the pumpkin guts feels, “awesome and kind of slimy.” While he and his brothers Asher and Hyrum enthusiastically tackled that task mom patiently waited on the side, ready to begin carving the Jack-o-Lantern in the making.

Carving was allowed only for ‘families’ where the parents could be right there to supervise or handle the carving tools themselves.  Kuta provided a variety of colorful paints for those who were a bit too young to handle knives so the younger children could still create their own spooky pumpkins.  A great time was had by all with nobody feeling left out of the activity.

Some of the children were so excited by the colorful non-toxic, paint they decided to taste it but quickly found out that the paint looks much better on the pumpkin than it tasted in their mouth and went back to creating their masterpieces.

The parents who carved their pumpkins were old enough to already know that pumpkin seeds are far yummier after they’ve been roasted and salted rather than straight out of the pumpkin. They were able to keep the kids on task scooping out the stringy mess while they waited on the sidelines with the carving instruments waiting to create the perfectly scary designs.

The Virgin Valley Heritage Museum sponsors free events for children and families all through the year.  Stop in the museum Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. to see all the great pieces of the Virgin Valley history and to find out all the activities they have offer. You can also find them on Facebook.

Actually carving the pumpkins was something that was kept to a family activity to ensure the safety of everyone during the Virgin Valley Heritage Museum’s pumpkin carving event on October 17.  The event was open to everyone and free to the public. Kids were busy scooping out gooey gobs of pumpkin guts while the parents carved the design in the pumpkins. Photo by Teri Nehrenz.

Actually carving the pumpkins was something that was kept to a family activity to ensure the safety of everyone during the Virgin Valley Heritage Museum’s pumpkin carving event on October 17. The event was open to everyone and free to the public. Kids were busy scooping out gooey gobs of pumpkin guts while the parents carved the design in the pumpkins. Photo by Teri Nehrenz.

Colorful, non-toxic paints were provided to the younger children who couldn’t handle knives or carving tools so they could still create their perfectly spooky Jack-o-Lantern for Halloween during the Pumpkin Carving event hosted by the Virgin Valley Heritage Museum on Oct. 17.  Photo by Teri Nehrenz.

Colorful, non-toxic paints were provided to the younger children who couldn’t handle knives or carving tools so they could still create their perfectly spooky Jack-o-Lantern for Halloween during the Pumpkin Carving event hosted by the Virgin Valley Heritage Museum on Oct. 17. Photo by Teri Nehrenz.

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