Council to go with RFC instead of Army Corps of Engineers

Tuesday night’s City Council Meeting was short and sweet with two items on the agenda.

The first, was a check presented to the City from the Southern Nevada Chapter of the International Code Council (SNICC) for $1,500 that will cover the cost of free swimming lessons to toddlers ages four and younger at the Mesquite Recreation Center.

Interim Director of the Athletics & Leisure Services Department, Nick Montoya, was on hand to accept the check from David Goldstein, the Director-At-Large with SNICC, and Stephen DiGiovanni, the new President of the SNICC.

“Since 2010, the program has benefited 227 youth just in this valley,” said Montoya. “They are possibly looking at increasing [the funding] in the next few years to cover more children.”

From left to right, Stephen DiGiovanni and David Goldstein present Nick Montoya with a check for $1,500 for free toddler swimming lessons. Photo by Stephanie Frehner.

From left to right, Stephen DiGiovanni and David Goldstein present Nick Montoya with a check for $1,500 for free toddler swimming lessons. Photo by Stephanie Frehner.

Goldstein spoke to the council and noted that over $75,000 has been given to Clark County since 2009 and the SNICC feels this is a much-needed program. Statistics have shown that the number of toddler drownings have been reduced in Clark County.

The other item on the agenda was for the council to decide whether or not to continue working with the Army Corps of Engineers on an area in Southeast Mesquite, off of East Mesquite Boulevard that has been affected by flooding in the past ten years.

“Back in 2010, that area was flooded,” said Public Works Director Bill Tanner. “Since 2012 we have been trying to work out a feasibility study agreement… we’ve met with the Army Corps of Engineers several times… they estimate an approval timeline of another 18 months.” Tanner continued to explain that it may take another seven to ten years to design, construct and finish the project.

“If we elect to go with Regional Flood Control (RFC) we could start July 1, 2015, we have $200,000 to start design; get an engineer on board to start design and possibly construct in 2017/2018 or 2018/2019. We can move some funding forward to provide that funding to do this project.” The funding would eventually be reimbursed to the City by the RFC.

“I really want to see this project move forward, seeing as this is 2015 and we are due for another 100 year flood,” said Councilwoman Cindi Delaney. “We really don’t know when it will happen again, but we need to get that area better protected.”

Councilman George Rapson also agreed and Councilman Kraig Hafen proceeded with the motion. By a unanimous vote, the motion passed that the City go with the second option, with RFC, moving the project forward and get it going sooner rather than later.

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