Writing to the Reader

Jerry Myers_12_26This week’s topic is writing to the reader.  Some of you may feel that a writer may not care about who reads their work.  That is far from the truth.  Writers take into account their intended readers, and how they should present their work, and what format that they should write in for their intended audience.

The news writers even take a moment to think about the tone and tenor of their article before writing it.  The writer of nonfiction biographies and historical event novels also take the readers into account when writing their books.  The aim is to entertain and inform a hard balance to strike when the subject matter is general publicly viewed as dry.

Fiction writer usually consider the age groups that they want to reach out to, a case in point.  J K Rowling wrote her Harry Potter to particular age groups, and for ten years we read as Harry and friends grew up, and the writing style changed also, Point of View, Allegory, Symbolism, and tone became more complex.  Rowling told the whole “Coming of Age” tale in seven books, aiming at a particular age group with each installment.

In general writers tend to write in particular genera, and become known for those particular genera.   Steven King for example is primarily known for Horror genres, “Pet Cemetery”, and “Carrie”.  When King went to write in other genera he used a pen name or (Nom de Plume) as did J K Rowling.  The segment of the reading public that collect a particular author tend to look for their favorite writer, looking at the cover and buying the book with no other concerns other than the author.

Considerations for the reading public are many, and a writer has to fashion their fiction stories around the audience they wish to reach.  There are thirteen points that have to be considered, and these are basic points.  Writers are still debating as to which and what order of importance should be given to each one.  These are Suspension of disbelief, Point of View, Allegory, Symbolism, Tone, and Imagery.  The choice of Narration style, Punctuation, Grammar, Word choice, and Imagination are also considerations.  The characters’ voice, or character dialog, and most importantly Story Cohesion must be defined and adhered to.

Most are editorial concerns, Punctuation, Grammar, and Word choice.  Choosing words is more of a concern of reader literateness and comprehension.  Most writer write at the sixth grade level, more to have a work that can be more generally understood, and not have a reputation as an arrogant writer, ostensibly writing only to the “Highly Educated”.

Writing is painting a picture in the reader’s mind.  To do this effectively you have to know your audience, or target group.  This is writing to the reader.

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